Commit 4591ad2d authored by Camilla Berglund's avatar Camilla Berglund
Browse files

Documentation work.

parent c769061a
......@@ -666,6 +666,8 @@ INPUT = @GLFW_INTERNAL_DOCS@ \
@GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/monitor.dox \
@GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/window.dox \
@GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/input.dox \
@GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/common.dox \
@GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/rift.dox \
@GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/compat.dox
# This tag can be used to specify the character encoding of the source files
......@@ -936,7 +938,7 @@ HTML_EXTRA_STYLESHEET = @GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/extra.css
# files. In the HTML_STYLESHEET file, use the file name only. Also note that
# the files will be copied as-is; there are no commands or markers available.
HTML_EXTRA_FILES =
HTML_EXTRA_FILES = @GLFW_SOURCE_DIR@/docs/spaces.svg
# The HTML_COLORSTYLE_HUE tag controls the color of the HTML output.
# Doxygen will adjust the colors in the style sheet and background images
......
/*!
@page build Building programs that use GLFW
@page build Building applications
@tableofcontents
This is about compiling and linking programs that use GLFW. For information on
how to write such programs, start with the [introductory tutorial](@ref quick).
This is about compiling and linking applications that use GLFW. For information on
how to write such applications, start with the [introductory tutorial](@ref quick).
For information on how to compile the GLFW library itself, see the @ref compile
guide.
This is not a tutorial on compilation. It assumes basic understanding of how to
compile a C program as well as how to use the specific compiler of your chosen
development environment. The compilation process should be explained in your
C programming material and the use of and options for your compiler should be
described in detail in the documentation for your development environment.
This is not a tutorial on compilation or linking. It assumes basic
understanding of how to compile and link a C program as well as how to use the
specific compiler of your chosen development environment. The compilation
and linking process should be explained in your C programming material and in
the documentation for your development environment.
@section build_include Including the GLFW header file
In the files of your program where you use OpenGL or GLFW, you should include
the GLFW header file, i.e.:
In the source files of your application where you use OpenGL or GLFW, you should
include the GLFW header file, i.e.:
@code
#include <GLFW/glfw3.h>
......@@ -30,13 +30,14 @@ types and function prototypes of the OpenGL API.
The GLFW header also defines everything necessary for your OpenGL header to
function. For example, under Windows you are normally required to include
`windows.h` before the OpenGL header. This would make your source file tied
to Windows and pollute your code's namespace with the whole Win32 API.
`windows.h` before the OpenGL header, which would pollute your code namespace
with the entire Win32 API.
Instead, the GLFW header takes care of this for you, not by including
`windows.h`, but by duplicating only the very few necessary parts of it. It
does this only when needed, so if `windows.h` *is* included, the GLFW header
does not try to redefine those symbols.
does not try to redefine those symbols. The reverse is not true, i.e.
`windows.h` cannot cope if any of its symbols have already been defined.
In other words:
......@@ -44,7 +45,7 @@ In other words:
- Do *not* include `windows.h` or other platform-specific headers unless you
plan on using those APIs directly
- If you *do* need to include such headers, do it *before* including
the GLFW one and it will detect this
the GLFW header and it will handle this
If you are using an OpenGL extension loading library such as
[glad](https://github.com/Dav1dde/glad), the extension loader header should
......@@ -60,28 +61,29 @@ its behavior.
`GLFW_DLL` is required on Windows when using the GLFW DLL, to tell the compiler
that the GLFW functions are defined in a DLL.
The following macros control which client API header is included.
The following macros control which OpenGL or OpenGL ES API header is included.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_GLCOREARB` makes the header include the modern `GL/glcorearb.h`
header (`OpenGL/gl3.h` on OS X) instead of the regular OpenGL header.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_GLCOREARB` makes the GLFW header include the modern
`GL/glcorearb.h` header (`OpenGL/gl3.h` on OS X) instead of the regular OpenGL
header.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES1` makes the header include the OpenGL ES 1.x `GLES/gl.h` header
instead of the regular OpenGL header.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES1` makes the GLFW header include the OpenGL ES 1.x `GLES/gl.h`
header instead of the regular OpenGL header.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES2` makes the header include the OpenGL ES 2.0 `GLES2/gl2.h`
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES2` makes the GLFW header include the OpenGL ES 2.0 `GLES2/gl2.h`
header instead of the regular OpenGL header.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES3` makes the header include the OpenGL ES 3.0 `GLES3/gl3.h`
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES3` makes the GLFW header include the OpenGL ES 3.0 `GLES3/gl3.h`
header instead of the regular OpenGL header.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES31` makes the header include the OpenGL ES 3.1 `GLES3/gl31.h`
`GLFW_INCLUDE_ES31` makes the GLFW header include the OpenGL ES 3.1 `GLES3/gl31.h`
header instead of the regular OpenGL header.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_NONE` makes the header not include any client API header. This is
useful in combination with an extension loading library.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_NONE` makes the GLFW header not include any OpenGL or OpenGL ES API
header. This is useful in combination with an extension loading library.
If none of the above inclusion macros are defined, the standard OpenGL header is
included.
If none of the above inclusion macros are defined, the standard OpenGL `GL/gl.h`
header (`OpenGL/gl.h` on OS X) is included.
`GLFW_INCLUDE_GLU` makes the header include the GLU header *in addition to* the
header selected above. This should only be used with legacy code. GLU has been
......@@ -104,12 +106,6 @@ hard-coded into your build environment. See the section for your development
environment below. On Linux and other Unix-like operating systems, the list
varies but can be retrieved in various ways as described below.
This is not a tutorial on linking. It assumes basic understanding of how to
link a C program as well as how to use the specific linker of your chosen
development environment. The linking process should be explained in your
C programming material and the use of and options for your linker should be
described in detail in the documentation for your development environment.
A good general introduction to linking is
[Beginner's Guide to Linkers](http://www.lurklurk.org/linkers/linkers.html) by
David Drysdale.
......@@ -120,20 +116,20 @@ David Drysdale.
The static version of the GLFW library is named `glfw3`. When using this
version, it is also necessary to link with some libraries that GLFW uses.
When linking a program under Windows that uses the static version of GLFW, you
must link with `opengl32`. On some versions of MinGW, you must also explicitly
link with `gdi32`, while other versions of MinGW include it in the set of
default libraries along with other dependencies like `user32` and `kernel32`.
If you are using GLU, you must also link with `glu32`.
When linking an application under Windows that uses the static version of GLFW,
you must link with `opengl32`. On some versions of MinGW, you must also
explicitly link with `gdi32`, while other versions of MinGW include it in the
set of default libraries along with other dependencies like `user32` and
`kernel32`. If you are using GLU, you must also link with `glu32`.
The link library for the GLFW DLL is named `glfw3dll`. When compiling a program
that uses the DLL version of GLFW, you need to define the `GLFW_DLL` macro
*before* any inclusion of the GLFW header. This can be done either with
The link library for the GLFW DLL is named `glfw3dll`. When compiling an
application that uses the DLL version of GLFW, you need to define the `GLFW_DLL`
macro *before* any inclusion of the GLFW header. This can be done either with
a compiler switch or by defining it in your source code.
A program using the GLFW DLL does not need to link against any of its
dependencies, but you still have to link against `opengl32` if your program uses
OpenGL and `glu32` if it uses GLU.
An application using the GLFW DLL does not need to link against any of its
dependencies, but you still have to link against `opengl32` if your application
uses OpenGL and `glu32` if it uses GLU.
@subsection build_link_cmake_source With CMake and GLFW source
......@@ -266,8 +262,12 @@ If you are using the dynamic library version of GLFW, simply add it to the
project dependencies.
If you are using the static library version of GLFW, add it and the Cocoa,
OpenGL, IOKit and CoreVideo frameworks to the project as dependencies. They can
all be found in `/System/Library/Frameworks`.
OpenGL, IOKit, CoreVideo and Carbon frameworks to the project as dependencies.
They can all be found in `/System/Library/Frameworks`.
@note GLFW needs the Carbon framework only to access the current keyboard layout
via the Text Input Source Services. This is one of the non-deprecated parts of
the Carbon API and the only way to access this information on OS X.
@subsection build_link_osx With command-line on OS X
......
/*!
@page common Common tasks
@tableofcontents
This guide explains how to
@section common_full_screen Windowed full screen mode
@section common_window_pos Initial window position
GLFW comes with the `windows` test program, which illustrates this method.
@section common_fps_camera First-person camera controls
*/
......@@ -4,19 +4,20 @@
@tableofcontents
This chapter describes the various API extensions used by this version of GLFW.
This guide describes the various API extensions used by this version of GLFW.
It lists what are essentially implementation details, but which are nonetheless
vital knowledge for developers wishing to deploy their applications on machines
with varied specifications.
vital knowledge for developers intending to deploy their applications on a wide
range of machines.
@note The information in this guide is not a part of GLFW API, but merely
preconditions for some parts of the library to function on a given machine. Any
part of this information may change in future versions of GLFW and that will not
be considered a breaking API change.
Note that the information in this appendix is not a part of the API
specification but merely list some of the preconditions for certain parts of the
API to function on a given machine. As such, any part of it may change in
future versions without this being considered a breaking API change.
@section compat_x11 X11 extensions, protocols and IPC standards
As GLFW uses Xlib, directly, without any intervening toolkit
As GLFW uses Xlib directly, without any intervening toolkit
library, it has sole responsibility for interacting well with the many and
varied window managers in use on Unix-like systems. In order for applications
and window managers to work well together, a number of standards and
......@@ -79,13 +80,14 @@ GLFW requires the Xkb extension with detectable auto-repeat to provide keyboard
input. If the running X server does not support this extension, a non-Xkb
fallback path is used.
@section compat_glx GLX extensions
The GLX API is the default API used to create OpenGL contexts on Unix-like
systems using the X Window System.
GLFW uses the `GLXFBConfig` API to enumerate and select framebuffer pixel
formats. This requires GLX 1.3 or greater.
GLFW uses the GLX 1.3 `GLXFBConfig` functions to enumerate and select framebuffer pixel
formats. If GLX 1.3 is not supported, @ref glfwInit will fail.
GLFW uses the `GLX_MESA_swap_control,` `GLX_EXT_swap_control` and
`GLX_SGI_swap_control` extensions to provide vertical retrace synchronization
......
......@@ -5,36 +5,45 @@
@tableofcontents
This is about compiling the GLFW library itself. For information on how to
build programs that use GLFW, see the @ref build guide.
build applications that use GLFW, see the @ref build guide.
@section compile_deps Dependencies
@section compile_cmake Using CMake
To compile GLFW and the accompanying example programs, you will need **CMake**,
which will generate the project files or makefiles for your particular
development environment. If you are on a Unix-like system such as Linux or
FreeBSD or have a package system like Fink, MacPorts, Cygwin or Homebrew, you
can simply install its CMake package. If not, you can get installers for
Windows and OS X from the [CMake website](http://www.cmake.org/).
GLFW uses [CMake](http://www.cmake.org/) to generate project files or makefiles
for a particular development environment. If you are on a Unix-like system such
as Linux or FreeBSD or have a package system like Fink, MacPorts, Cygwin or
Homebrew, you can simply install its CMake package. If not, you can download
installers for Windows and OS X from the [CMake website](http://www.cmake.org/).
Additional dependencies are listed below.
@note CMake only generates project files or makefiles. It does not compile the
actual GLFW library. To compile GLFW, first generate these files and then use
them in your chosen development environment to compile the actual GLFW library.
If you wish to compile GLFW without CMake, see @ref compile_manual.
@subsection compile_deps Dependencies
@subsection compile_deps_msvc Dependencies using Visual C++ on Windows
Once you have installed CMake, make sure that all other dependencies are
available. On some platforms, GLFW needs a few additional packages to be
installed. See the section for your chosen platform and development environment
below.
The Microsoft Platform SDK that is installed along with Visual C++ contains all
the necessary headers, link libraries and tools except for CMake.
@subsubsection compile_deps_msvc Dependencies for Visual C++ on Windows
@subsection compile_deps_mingw Dependencies with MinGW or MinGW-w64 on Windows
The Microsoft Platform SDK that is installed along with Visual C++ already
contains all the necessary headers, link libraries and tools except for CMake.
Move on to @ref compile_generate.
Both the MinGW and the MinGW-w64 packages contain all the necessary headers,
link libraries and tools except for CMake.
@subsubsection compile_deps_mingw Dependencies for MinGW or MinGW-w64 on Windows
@subsection compile_deps_mingw_cross Dependencies using MinGW or MinGW-w64 cross-compilation
Both the MinGW and the MinGW-w64 packages already contain all the necessary
headers, link libraries and tools except for CMake. Move on to @ref
compile_generate.
@subsubsection compile_deps_mingw_cross Dependencies for MinGW or MinGW-w64 cross-compilation
Both Cygwin and many Linux distributions have MinGW or MinGW-w64 packages. For
example, Cygwin has the `mingw64-i686-gcc` and `mingw64-x86_64-gcc` packages
......@@ -45,7 +54,9 @@ GLFW has CMake toolchain files in the `CMake/` directory that allow for easy
cross-compilation of Windows binaries. To use these files you need to add a
special parameter when generating the project files or makefiles:
cmake -DCMAKE_TOOLCHAIN_FILE=<toolchain-file> .
@code{.sh}
cmake -DCMAKE_TOOLCHAIN_FILE=<toolchain-file> .
@endcode
The exact toolchain file to use depends on the prefix used by the MinGW or
MinGW-w64 binaries on your system. You can usually see this in the /usr
......@@ -53,21 +64,27 @@ directory. For example, both the Debian/Ubuntu and Cygwin MinGW-w64 packages
have `/usr/x86_64-w64-mingw32` for the 64-bit compilers, so the correct
invocation would be:
cmake -DCMAKE_TOOLCHAIN_FILE=CMake/x86_64-w64-mingw32.cmake .
@code{.sh}
cmake -DCMAKE_TOOLCHAIN_FILE=CMake/x86_64-w64-mingw32.cmake .
@endcode
For more details see the article
[CMake Cross Compiling](http://www.paraview.org/Wiki/CMake_Cross_Compiling) on
the CMake wiki.
Once you have this set up, move on to @ref compile_generate.
@subsection compile_deps_xcode Dependencies using Xcode on OS X
@subsubsection compile_deps_xcode Dependencies for Xcode on OS X
Xcode contains all necessary tools except for CMake. The necessary headers and
libraries are included in the core OS frameworks. Xcode can be downloaded from
the Mac App Store or from the ADC Member Center.
Xcode comes with all necessary tools except for CMake. The required headers
and libraries are included in the core OS X frameworks. Xcode can be downloaded
from the Mac App Store or from the ADC Member Center.
Once you have Xcode installed, move on to @ref compile_generate.
@subsection compile_deps_x11 Dependencies using Linux and X11
@subsubsection compile_deps_x11 Dependencies for Linux and X11
To compile GLFW for X11, you need to have the X11 and OpenGL header packages
installed, as well as the basic development tools like GCC and make. For
......@@ -78,8 +95,11 @@ packages. GLFW itself doesn't need or use GLU, but some of the examples do.
Note that using header files and libraries from Mesa during compilation *will
not* tie your binaries to the Mesa implementation of OpenGL.
Once you have installed the necessary packages, move on to @ref
compile_generate.
@section compile_cmake Generating files with CMake
@subsection compile_generate Generating build files with CMake
Once you have all necessary dependencies it is time to generate the project
files or makefiles for your development environment. CMake needs to know two
......@@ -91,36 +111,59 @@ otherwise it is called an out-of-tree build.
One of several advantages of out-of-tree builds is that you can generate files
and compile for different development environments using a single source tree.
@note This section is about generating the project files or makefiles necessary
to compile the GLFW library, not about compiling the actual library.
@subsection compile_cmake_cli Generating files with the CMake command-line tool
@subsubsection compile_generate_cli Generating files with the CMake command-line tool
To make an in-tree build, enter the *root* directory of the GLFW source tree
(i.e. *not* the `src` subdirectory) and run CMake. The current directory is
used as target path, while the path provided as an argument is used to find the
source tree.
cd <glfw-root-dir>
cmake .
@code{.sh}
cd <glfw-root-dir>
cmake .
@endcode
To make an out-of-tree build, make another directory, enter it and run CMake
with the (relative or absolute) path to the root of the source tree as an
argument.
cd <glfw-root-dir>
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
@code{.sh}
cd <glfw-root-dir>
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
@endcode
Once you have generated the project files or makefiles for your chosen
development environment, move on to @ref compile_compile.
@subsection compile_cmake_gui Generating files with the CMake GUI
@subsubsection compile_generate_gui Generating files with the CMake GUI
If you are using the GUI version, choose the root of the GLFW source tree as
source location and the same directory or another, empty directory as the
destination for binaries. Choose *Configure*, change any options you wish to,
*Configure* again to let the changes take effect and then *Generate*.
Once you have generated the project files or makefiles for your chosen
development environment, move on to @ref compile_compile.
@subsection compile_compile Compiling the library
You should now have all required dependencies and the project files or makefiles
necessary to compile GLFW. Go ahead and compile the actual GLFW library with
these files, as you would with any other project.
Once the GLFW library is compiled, you are ready to build your applications,
linking it to the GLFW library. See the @ref build guide for more information.
@section compile_options CMake options
@subsection compile_options CMake options
The CMake files for GLFW provide a number of options, although not all are
available on all supported platforms. Some of these are de facto standards
......@@ -132,7 +175,7 @@ Some package systems like Ubuntu and other distributions based on Debian
GNU/Linux have this tool in a separate `cmake-curses-gui` package.
@subsection compile_options_shared Shared CMake options
@subsubsection compile_options_shared Shared CMake options
`BUILD_SHARED_LIBS` determines whether GLFW is built as a static
library or as a DLL / shared library / dynamic library.
......@@ -157,7 +200,7 @@ built along with the library.
the library.
@subsection compile_options_osx OS X specific CMake options
@subsubsection compile_options_osx OS X specific CMake options
`GLFW_USE_CHDIR` determines whether `glfwInit` changes the current
directory of bundled applications to the `Contents/Resources` directory.
......@@ -171,7 +214,7 @@ Retina displays.
`GLFW_BUILD_UNIVERSAL` determines whether to build Universal Binaries.
@subsection compile_options_win32 Windows specific CMake options
@subsubsection compile_options_win32 Windows specific CMake options
`USE_MSVC_RUNTIME_LIBRARY_DLL` determines whether to use the DLL version or the
static library version of the Visual C++ runtime library. If set to `ON`, the
......@@ -189,7 +232,7 @@ symbol, which forces the use of the high-performance GPU on nVidia Optimus
systems.
@subsection compile_options_egl EGL specific CMake options
@subsubsection compile_options_egl EGL specific CMake options
`GLFW_USE_EGL` determines whether to use EGL instead of the platform-specific
context creation API. Note that EGL is not yet provided on all supported
......
/*!
@page context Context handling guide
@page context Context guide
@tableofcontents
......@@ -8,31 +8,52 @@ The primary purpose of GLFW is to provide a simple interface to window
management and OpenGL and OpenGL ES context creation. GLFW supports
multiple windows, with each window having its own context.
This guide introduces the functions related to managing OpenGL and OpenGL ES
contexts. There are also guides for the other areas of the GLFW API.
@section context_object Context handles
- @ref intro
- @ref window
- @ref monitor
- @ref input
The @ref GLFWwindow object encapsulates both a [window](@ref window) and
a context. It is created with @ref glfwCreateWindow and destroyed with @ref
@section context_object Context objects
@ref window_object encapsulate both the OS level window and a OpenGL or OpenGL
ES context. It is created with @ref glfwCreateWindow and destroyed with @ref
glfwDestroyWindow or @ref glfwTerminate. As the window and context are
inseparably linked, the object pointer is used as both a context and window
handle.
handle. See @ref window_creation for more information.
@section context_hints Context creation hints
@subsection context_hints Context creation hints
There are a number of hints, specified using @ref glfwWindowHint, related to
what kind of context is created. See
[context related hints](@ref window_hints_ctx) in the window handling guide.
[context related hints](@ref window_hints_ctx) in the window guide.
@subsection context_sharing Context object sharing
When creating a window and its OpenGL or OpenGL ES context with @ref
glfwCreateWindow, you can specify another window whose context the new one
should share its objects (textures, vertex and element buffers, etc.) with.
@code
GLFWwindow* second_window = glfwCreateWindow(640, 480, "Second Window", NULL, first_window);
@endcode
Object sharing is implemented by the operating system and graphics driver. On
platforms where it is possible to choose which types of objects are shared, GLFW
requests that all types are shared.
@section context_sharing Context object sharing
See the relevant chapter of the [OpenGL](https://www.opengl.org/registry/) or
[OpenGL ES](http://www.khronos.org/opengles/) reference documents for more
information. The name and number of this chapter unfortunately varies between
versions and APIs, but has at times been named *Shared Objects and Multiple
Contexts*.
When creating a window and context with @ref glfwCreateWindow, you can specify
another window whose context the new one should share its objects with. Object
sharing is implemented by the operating system and graphics driver and is
described in the OpenGL and OpenGL ES documentation. On platforms where it is
possible to choose which types of objects are shared, GLFW requests that all are
shared.
GLFW comes with a simple object sharing test program called `sharing`.
@section context_current Current context
......@@ -53,14 +74,14 @@ The current context is returned by @ref glfwGetCurrentContext.
GLFWwindow* window = glfwGetCurrentContext();
@endcode
@note A context must only be current for a single thread at a time, and a thread
must only have a single context current at a time.
@note A context can only be current for a single thread at a time, and a thread
can only have a single context current at a time.
@section context_swap Swapping buffers
@section context_swap Buffer swapping
Buffer swapping is part of the window and framebuffer, not the context. See
@ref window_swap in the window handling guide.
@ref window_swap in the window guide.
@section context_glext OpenGL and OpenGL ES extensions
......@@ -170,10 +191,8 @@ that extension and then, if it introduces new functions, retrieve the pointers
to those functions. GLFW provides @ref glfwExtensionSupported and @ref
glfwGetProcAddress for manual loading of extensions and new API functions.
@note It is strongly recommended that you use an existing extension loader
library like [glad](https://github.com/Dav1dde/glad) instead of loading
manually. Extension loading is a solved problem and you will gain nothing from
solving it again by hand.
@note It is recommended that you use an existing extension loader library, as
described above, instead of loading manually.
@subsubsection context_glext_header The glext.h header
......
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/*!
@page input Input handling guide
@page input Input guide
@tableofcontents
@section input_key Keyboard input
This guide introduces the input related functions of GLFW. There are also
guides for the other areas of GLFW.
- @ref intro
- @ref window